Those most nearly touched social criticism

They do not expect that the free right to vote, to enjoy civic rights, and to be educated, will come in a moment; they do not expect to see the bias and prejudices of years disappear Those most nearly touched social criticism the blast of a trumpet; but they are absolutely certain that the way for a people to gain their reasonable rights is not by voluntarily throwing them away and insisting that they do not want them; that the way for a people to gain respect is not by continually belittling and ridiculing themselves; that, on the contrary, Negroes must insist continually, in season and out of season, that voting is necessary to modern manhood, that color discrimination is barbarism, and that black boys need education as well as white boys.

Discriminating and broad-minded criticism is what the South needs, — needs it for the sake of her own white sons and daughters, and for the insurance of robust, healthy mental and moral development.

Washington not to acknowledge that in several instances he has opposed movements in the South which were unjust to the Negro; he sent memorials to the Louisiana and Alabama constitutional conventions, he has spoken against lynching, and in other ways has openly or silently set his influence against sinister schemes and unfortunate happenings.

If worse comes to worst, can the moral fibre of this country survive the slow throttling and murder of nine millions of men? It is as though Nature must needs make men narrow in order to give them force.

Such men feel in conscience bound to ask of this nation three things. The supplementary truths must never be lost sight of: In the North the feeling has several times forced itself into words, that Mr.

But aside from this, there is among educated and thoughtful colored men in all parts of the land a feeling of deep regret, sorrow, and apprehension at the wide currency and ascendancy which some of Mr.

Of Mr. Booker T. Washington and Others

Washington apologizes for injustice, North or South, does not rightly value the privilege and duty of voting, belittles the emasculating effects of caste distinctions, and opposes the higher training and ambition of our brighter minds,—so far as he, the South, or the Nation, does this,—we must unceasingly and firmly oppose them.

And yet this very singleness of vision and thorough oneness with his age is a mark of the successful man. But he passed away in his prime. The South ought to be led, by candid and honest criticism, to assert her better self and do her full duty to the race she has cruelly wronged and is still wronging.

Washington has not always been of this broad character. Furthermore, to no class is the indiscriminate endorsement of the recent course of the South toward Negroes more nauseating than to the best thought of the South. In the North the feeling has several times forced itself into words, that Mr.

When sticks and stones and beasts form the sole environment of a people, their attitude is largely one of determined opposition to and conquest of natural forces. That all men are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creater with certain unalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

He is striving nobly to make Negro artisans business men and property-owners; but it is utterly impossible, under modern competitive methods, for workingmen and property-owners to defend their rights and exist without the right of suffrage.

Washington has encountered the strongest and most lasting opposition, amounting at times to bitterness, and even to-day continuing strong and insistent even though largely silenced in outward expression by the public opinion of the nation.

One wonders what Socrates and St. Know ye not Who would be free themselves must strike the blow? While, then, criticism has not failed to follow Mr.

Then came the Revolution ofthe suppression of the Negro votes, the changing and shifting of ideals, and the seeking of new lights in the great night.

It startled the nation to hear a Negro advocating such a programme after many decades of bitter complaint; it startled and won the applause of the South, it interested and won the admiration of the North; and after a confused murmur of protest, it silenced if it did not convert the Negroes themselves.

So both approved it, and today its author is certainly the most distinguished Southerner since Jefferson Davis, and the one with the largest personal following.

The black men of America have a duty to perform, a duty stern and delicate,—a forward movement to oppose a part of the work of their greatest leader. Washington thus faces the triple paradox of his career: Washington knew the heart of the South from birth and training, so by singular insight he intuitively grasped the spirit of the age which was dominating the North.

The right to vote. He advocates common-school and industrial training, and depreciates institutions of higher learning; but neither the Negro common-schools, nor Tuskegee itself, could remain open a day were it not for teachers trained in Negro colleges, or trained by their graduates.

But the hushing of the criticism of honest opponents is a dangerous thing.Those Most Nearly Touched: Social Criticism in American Literature B. DuBois, who believed that "Honest and earnest criticism from those whose interests are most nearly touched-- criticism of writers by readers, of government by those governed, of leaders by those led--this is the soul of democracy and the safeguard of modern society.".

Honest and earnest criticism from those whose interests are most nearly touched,—criticism of writers by readers, of government by those governed, of leaders by those led, — this is the soul of democracy and the safeguard of modern society. Honest and earnest criticism from those whose interests are most nearly touched,--criticism of writers by readers, --this is the soul of democracy and the safeguard of modern society.

If the best of the American Negroes receive by outer pressure a leader whom they had not recognized before, manifestly there is here a certain palpable gain.

One of the most influential critics of the social problems in American history was Civil Rights spokesperson W.E.B. DuBois, who believed that "Honest and earnest criticism from those whose interests are most nearly touched--criticism of writers by readers, of.

One of the most influential critics of the social problems in American history was Civil Rights spokesperson W.E.B. DuBois, who believed that "Honest and earnest criticism from those whose interests are most nearly touched--criticism of writers by readers, of government by those governed, of leaders by those led--this is the soul of democracy and the safeguard of modern society.".

One of the most influential critics of the social problems in American history was Civil Rights spokesperson W. E. B. DuBois, who believed that “Honest and earnest criticism from those whose interests are most nearly touched–criticism of writers by readers, of government by those governed, of leaders by those led–this is the soul of democracy and the safeguard of modern society.

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Those most nearly touched social criticism
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